January 16, 2010

Mary Quant, Chelsea, 1964

Doyen of the nazz, Mary Quant ponders the next “new look” for Swinging London. The gesture unwittingly invokes the entreaty for someone unseen to “speak up”.  Coiffure by Vidal Sassoon.

January 16, 2010

Keith Richards, London, 1964

Keith emulates the look to see if it will catch on.  Mick feigns approbation, but clearly has no idea what is happening.

January 16, 2010

Anti-draft protestors, San Francisco, 1968

The look infiltrates hippydom.

January 16, 2010

David Bowie, Hunky Dory, 1971

Always one to set trends rather than respond to them, Bowie looks dismayed on the cover art of Hunky Dory (1971), realising that he must hang with the in crowd if he is to stay relevant.

January 16, 2010

Suffragette, Philadelphia, 1910

At this women’s rights rally, Elizabeth Cady Stanton elicits both the potential for speech at a distance as well as the social penance of what Sadie Plant has described as “enforced eavesdropping”.

January 16, 2010

Troops, Meuse-Argonne offensive, France, 1918

“Well, I say old chap, drinks would be spiffing but I’m rather tied up with old Gerry at the moment”

January 16, 2010

Troops, Meuse-Argonne offensive, France, 1918

‘Fancy popping off for a bit and doffing a G & T and spot of the old crumpet, my good fellow?’

January 16, 2010

New York street scene, 1938

Not even the temptation of red, juicy apples could draw Eduard Suvee, manager of the Yankees star pitcher, Lefty Gomez, from his solipsism as he sped past the cart on his way to yet another important meeting at Yankee Stadium.

January 16, 2010

Edward Chwasta and unidentified escort, Supper Club, New York, 1938

“And I said, Bovey old chap, you really are a crashing bore. And so the bastard hit me!”

January 16, 2010

Senior Citizens, St. Petersburg, Florida, 1959

Charles Greenwater struggles with a ridiculously small keypad and the annoyance of predictive text while attempting to notify his wife that the bus is running late again.